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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Has anyone adjusted the chain, besides me? Mine was too loose (and a little crooked) from the dealer, so it was one of the first things I had to do. Anyway, once adjusted properly, the chain should stay in specs a long time, since it's a good chain.

Here is how I adjust chains: Mark down on a piece of paper for both L and R how many lines show on the chain adjuster bracket...should be equal on both sides. When a chain is too loose, turning the adjusting nuts clockwise makes more lines show and tightens the chain. As an example, if there are 4 lines showing on each side before you start and the chain is too loose, when you are done, there should be about 4.5 lines showing on each side once the chain is back into specs. I have a block of wood with the proper chain tension measured off and it is easier to use that and place it near the end of the chain guide as per the directions in the manual vs. using a ruler.

Begin by loosening the axle nut a little while the bike is on the side stand. Next, place the bike on a swingarm stand and loosen the axle nut some more till it is quite loose, but you don't need to remove it completely. Now unscrew the chain adjusting nuts and set nuts on both sides. Say the chain needs to be a bit tighter. OK, then you will need to screw-in both adjusting nuts a little. It helps to mark where they were in relation to the swingarm before beginning with a sharpie so you don't get lost. How could you get lost? Cause when you start unscrewing the nuts, the wheel moves and it leaves a uneven gap on each side. OK, so now it is trial and error, but try screwing in both adjusting nuts a quarter turn. Don't try to measure anything now cause things will still change. Instead, place a thin screwdriver into the valley of the rear sprocket and wind the screwdriver up in the rear wheel a little until the chain becomes tight and there is resistence. This also forces the wheel into alignment and removes any slack a the back of the swingarm. Now your adjusting nuts should be against the swingarm on both sides. Screw down the set nuts, and tighten, but do not torque the axle nut. Remove the screwdriver and check the tension, straightness and that the same number of lines are visible on each side of the swing arm bracket. If so, put the bike down and torque it to specs.

What can go wrong? You can have the chain adjusted properly, but as you begin to tighten the axle nut, things go out of alignment and typically you will have more lines showing on the right than the left swing arm bracket because the wheel moved as you tightened the axle nut. You can remedy this by holding the rear wheel in place as you tighten the axle nut...OR what I do is NOT even touch the right side adjusting nut to begin with and only screw in the left adjusting nut a quarter turn. Now as you tighten the axle nut, the lines should match up on each side evenly and there will be a slight space (about a quarter turn) at the back of the right adjusting nut to tighten down along with the right set nut so in the end you screwed in each adjusting nut a quarter turn, the chain is even, and in specs.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Slightly different adjusters and brackets, but it's a good video. I am not fond of the FZ-07 brackets. The lines are on a pedestal so if you are looking from a slightly different angle, the number of lines appearing on the bracket changes. Better if the lines were flush with the swing arm, in other words with no space between the two. You just have to remember to look straight in on both sides when you count lines. If you aren't careful, those brackets can also rotate a little in which case they are not seated all the way which throws your measurements off a bit too. Once you do an adjustment you will see what I mean. Yes, measuring from the axle to the swing arm center is another measure. I always just lie down and view the chain along the top too from the back of the bike looking forward. It is easy to see if the chain is not straight. Some people report those chain tension lines being off...in other words, you can have equal lines showing on both sides but the chain will still be crooked. I have never found this to be the case however. The lines have always been spot on and are spot on with the FZ-07 too. Never hurts to double check though.
 

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I've always fine tuned my chain adjustment by going 50-60mph, making sure you're centered on the bike and on a road with no crowning. Let go of the bars. If the bike dives to the left or right the rear wheel is not tracking properly and the chain is also misaligned. If the bike dives to right, the right adjuster should be tightened or the left loosened. Or a combination of both to keep the same chain tension would be best. Diving to the right means that the front of the rear wheel is slightly to the left of the centerline. Keep adjusting until a hands free bike will roll straight without drifting left or right. I've tuned this way for years and you'll find less fatique if riding for longer distances also.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Interesting. I haven't heard this before but it makes sense. I do take my hands off the handlebars occasionally and haven't noticed any deviation. When I do it, I'm checking mostly for tire balance and faulty or loose steering head bearings which cause the bike to not track straight and smooth as well.
 

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When I'm flying an aircraft I always "trim" the airplane so it flies hands off, straight and level. I thought that it should also apply to riding and found that if the wheel is tracking and not producing any diving left or right, it's obviously correctly aligned with the sprocket and the chassis. Everything should be in harmony then.
 

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That's a cool tip I'm going to try it out but so far i dont feel any more drift from one side to another
I miss spoke. I should've said that if it's not diving or tracking, the rear wheel is obviously in alignment with the chassis and I guess I'm only assuming that means that the sprocket and chain are also aligned correctly. At any rate, it's how I've adjusted chains on motorcycles for 30+ years, it must be working. I'm really enjoying my new FZ-07!!
 

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So after hearing some strange rattling, humming noise after riding the other day, we also checked my chain. It was extremely loose. I mean is it that difficult to properly put a chain on at the dealer? Thanks for the video by the way, it was a great help in tightening the chain.
 

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Can anyone instruct me on how the rear chain wheel quick change carrier works, (that black metal piece that is bolted on the outside of the rear sprocket). I've never seen one and not familiar with them. According the the Renthal site a chain wheel carrier "is designed to enable the rear chain wheel to be changed without removing the rear wheel"

How does that work? Do you remove the axle and the quick change carrier so the sprocket can be removed without the wheel coming off?

I"m not even sure that thing IS a quick change carrier, but this is a picture of an aftermarket one.


I'm talking about the black bracket on the outside of the FZ sprocket.
 

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I changed my oil and adjusted the chain today. Noticed the 2.2 inch chain variation takes it comfortably up to the upper plastic guide. No need to break out the ruler for future measurements. Betting that Yamaha designed it that way. Or at least the service dept utilizes that practice to save time.
 
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